Saturday, August 6, 2011

Rescued, Fostered & Home Again

It's been a month since my last post and even then the posts were few and far between.  
I have been volunteering much of my time helping one of our local humane societies. I believe that saving just one dog will not change the world, but it will change the world for that dog. I have taken on the task of answering calls from people who can no longer keep their dog, have found a dog, or have lost their dog.  Believe me when I say that all my dog calls, and all the stories I hear, do not have happy endings.  Those stories, I will not talk about.  Instead I would like you to meet the faces of the dogs that have recently been rescued, found foster homes, and finally found a new permanent home.  All very happy ending stories, and today, with all the turmoil in our lives and in this world, we can certainly use a story,or eight, with a happy ending.

Sally

Rex
Cedar
PeeWee
Duke
Sampson
Bear
and last, 
but not least,
Penny
 


6 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing the good endings. I needed good endings today.

    Glad to see a post from you. I've missed you.

    Bert

    ReplyDelete
  2. I stand by your phrase . . . "it will change the world for that dog". What wonderful pictures.

    ReplyDelete
  3. What beautiful faces!!! I needed to see this post. Something good in the world! Thank you for all of your hard work helping these beautiful animals.

    ReplyDelete
  4. ...and part of me would take each and every dog I come across and make them my own special friends.

    Sigh, so glad to hear of happy endings.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Alway happy with HAPPY ENDINGS!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. We rescued Pepper Jax, then just "Jax", from an animal shelter. What a blessing he turned out to be. A Jack Russell Terrier. Wow.

    I like all these dog pictures. I must admit, though, that I don't like barbed wire. I would never use it but worked on a ranch in Arizona where it was seldom used. I don't like to see animals all shredded after encounters with barbed wire.

    It is a cruel thing to stretch across a field or be reminded of it.

    ReplyDelete